Social Psychology Peace Research: The needs of collective identities research

Vollhardt and Bilali (2008) focuses on the epistemology, concept, and concern of Social Psychology Peace Research (SPPR) that grows from elaboration of social psychology and psychology of peace. Social psychology, as stated by Vollhardt and Bilali, is uniquely positioned to analyze the interplay between the individual and the social or society in which also focuses…

Intergroup Dynamic Relations Research Towards Reconciliation and Peace

The awareness of casualties of war has been increasing within the global society nowadays. It leads to what Leidner et al. noted that, “globalization and cosmopolitanism have widened moral concern beyond group and state boundaries; … violence overall has declined steadily throughout human history” (p. 514). Nevertheless pessimistic view that human are violent “by nature”…

Resilience and Resilient Community

What is Resilience? The term ‘resilience’ occurred on the surface of discussion regarding human security and disaster. In everyday usage, John Twigg states that, resilience often mean the same as ‘capacity’ and ‘coping capacity’ [of community, emphasize by the author] (John Twigg, 2007). United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction defines resilience as, “[t]he ability…

The Meso-Level Theory in Religious-based Violence and Peace-Making

  This article particularly analyzes religious-based violence and peace-making using the theory, so-called: the meso-level theory. This theory operates the concepts of sociology of religion, especially the classical theories of Max Weber and Emile Durkheim. The meso-level theory of religious life from Max Weber consists of: [1] “religious leaders” and [2] “religious communities”. On the term…

Should We Seek the Grand Theory of Peace?

Debate on Grand Theory “Should we seek a grand theory of peace?” becomes a prominent question. Shin Chiba on his article “Is grand theory possible today?” has briefly and thoughtfully reviewed historical debates among thinkers and scholars on the “grand theory” in human sciences since the 1950s.[1] With his expertise in Peace Studies, Chiba pointed out that the seeking…

Very Short Notes on Johan Galtung: Examining Religious Based Violent Conflict

Comments on Johan Galtung, Peace, Research, Education, Action, (Copenhagen: Christian Eljers, 1975), I.1. & I.4., pp. 29-48, 109-134. I fascinate Johan Galtung’s background both as a Mathematician and as a Norwich Lutheran Christian. As a mathematician he used to think with rigorous and logic arguments. On the other hand, his Christian understanding of Peace might arguably…

Comments on M.K. Gandhi’s “Non-Violent Resistance”

Reading Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi’s Non-Violent Resistance echoes an interesting example of the contribution of religion on promoting peace and non-violent movement. In the last several years, world community has been shocked by 9/11 tragedy in U.S. Since then, religion has been under the spotlight of international eyes. Religions were suspected as the root of violence, such as terrorism. Terror…

Comments on Immanuel Kant’s “To Perpetual Peace”

Comments on Immanuel Kant, To Perpetual Peace, (Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company Inc., 2003), pp. 1-42. This short paper was written for a seminar class response of ICU Peace Studies course so-called, ‘Ideas on Peace’ which conducted by Prof. Shin Chiba on Autumn 2013. To understand Immanuel Kant’s thinking, I think it is very substantial to keep in…